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[p] conjecture pertaining to Gaussian integers by akdevaraj 11:31 am
Let the base be a Gaussian integer = a + ib. Let p be a prime number of shape 4m + 3. Then ((a + ib)^(p^2-1) - 1) == 0 (mod p). This is subject to the base, a + ib and p being co-prime,

[p] conjecture pertaining to Gaussian integers by akdevaraj 11:31 am
Let the base be a Gaussian integer = a + ib. Let p be a prime number of shape 4m + 3. Then ((a + ib)^(p^2-1) - 1) == 0 (mod p). This is subject to the base, a + ib and p being co-prime,

[p] conjecture pertaining to Gaussian integers by akdevaraj 11:31 am
Let the base be a Gaussian integer = a + ib. Let p be a prime number of shape 4m + 3. Then ((a + ib)^(p^2-1) - 1) == 0 (mod p). This is subject to the base, a + ib and p being co-prime,

[p] conjecture pertaining to Gaussian integers by akdevaraj 11:31 am
Let the base be a Gaussian integer = a + ib. Let p be a prime number of shape 4m + 3. Then ((a + ib)^(p^2-1) - 1) == 0 (mod p). This is subject to the base, a + ib and p being co-prime,

[p] Fermat theorem works by akdevaraj 11:24 am
Hi Jussi. Thanks will try.

[p] Fermat theorem works by akdevaraj 11:24 am
Hi Jussi. Thanks will try.

[p] Fermat theorem works by pahio Apr 20
Hi Deva, perhaps the entry 'theorem on sums of two squares by Fermat' may explain it or help this problem, Jussi

[p] Fermat's theorem works when the base is a Gaussian integer by akdevaraj Apr 19
What puzzles me is that the theorem works when the base is a prime in the ring of Gaussian integers and the exponent is a prime of shape 4m + 1 but does not work when the exponent is a prime of shape 4m+3.Can any one throw some light on this?

[p] On Measurement Assessment and Division Matrices by ProfHasan Apr 9
http://jsaer.com/download/vol-3-iss-6-2016/JSAER2016-03-06-233-237.pdf

[p] Division of Matrices by ProfHasan Apr 9
http://jsaer.com/download/vol-3-iss-5-2016/JSAER2016-03-05-101-104.pdf

[p] Division of Matrices by ProfHasan Apr 9
http://jsaer.com/download/vol-3-iss-5-2016/JSAER2016-03-05-101-104.pdf

[p] Division of Matrices by ProfHasan Apr 9
http://jsaer.com/download/vol-3-iss-5-2016/JSAER2016-03-05-101-104.pdf

[p] Division of Matrices by ProfHasan Apr 9
http://jsaer.com/download/vol-3-iss-5-2016/JSAER2016-03-05-101-104.pdf

[p] Division of Matrices by ProfHasan Apr 9
In this study, we deal with functions from the square matrices to square matrices, which the same order. Such a function will be called a linear transformation, defined as follows: Let Mn(R) be a set of square matrices of order n, n ϵ S, and A be regular matrix in Mn(R), then the special function TA: Mn(R) → Mn(R) X T X A   X A   is called a linear transformation of Mn(R) to Mn(R) the following two properties are true for all X,Y ϵ Mn(R), and scalars α ϵ R: i. TA (X+Y) = TA(X) + TA(Y). (We say that TA preserves additivity) ii. TA(αX)= αTA(X) (We say that TA preserves scalar multiplication) In this case the matrix A is called the standard matrix of the function TA. Here, we transfer some well known properties of linear transformations to the above defined elements in the set all { TA: A regular in Mn(R)} [1]