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conjugate diameters of ellipse

Defines: 
diameter of ellipse, conjugate diameter, conjugate radii
Keywords: 
diameter, tangent of ellipse
Type of Math Object: 
Topic
Major Section: 
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Mathematics Subject Classification

51N20 no label found

Comments

Given the two principal axes, x and y, isn't it just the
north-south y-axis is the conjugate axis, while the east-west, *perpendicular* x-axis is the transverse axis? See

http://books.google.com/books?id=Uk4wAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA1-PA381&zoom=3&sig=3Q...

http://books.google.com/books?id=OHsLAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA182&zoom=3&sig=_N9YWB...

~Kaimbridge~

The transverse axis and the conjugate axis concern only the hyperbola; the former is the line segment connecting the vertices. See http://planetmath/encyclopedia/Hyperbola.html.
Jussi

The transverse axis and the conjugate axis concern only the hyperbola; the former is the line segment connecting the vertices. See http://planetmath.org/encyclopedia/Hyperbola.html. (I corrected the URL.)
Jussi

Excuse, the following is the _correct_ URL:
http://planetmath/encyclopedia/Hyperbola2.html.
Jussi

But what about the sources I noted? They both are talking about ellipses, not hyperbolae *AND* when talking about great circle delineation, you are dealing with a transverse graticule (i.e, the polar vertex is "pulled down" to the equator). See

http://www.fas.org/irp/agency/nima/nug/gloss_t.html

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5b/Graticule_Perspectives.PNG

~Kaimbridge~

Dear Kaimbridge,
Maybe on your speciality (geodesy?), those terms are as you say. In mathematics, we speak only of the transverse axis and the conjugate axis of a hyperbola; see also in Wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conjugate_axis.
Wolfram (http://mathworld.wolfram.com/) doesn't know tose terms.
Best regards,
Jussi

P. S. -- As for ellipse, one speaks of major and minor (semi)axes.

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