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injective function

Synonym: 
one-to-one,injection,embedding,injective
Type of Math Object: 
Definition
Major Section: 
Reference
Groups audience: 

Mathematics Subject Classification

03E20 no label found03E99 no label found

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Because I saw the citation in this entry to wikipedia
I forward an e-mail which was circulated around and I received
from my cousin Demetrios who lives in New York.

" Wikipedia has a bad reputation in America. Recently
" in an article in the news on TV, Yahoo news, press, and
" even at the bank's display it was said wikipedia
" uses false accusations with no proof, undocumented stuff, biased
" articles.
" People I know consider it a junk. Read the article below
" got on December 5th 2005 from
" http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051205/ap_on_hi_te/wikipedia_rules

Online Encyclopedia Tightens Rules By DAN GOODIN,
Associated Press Writer
2 hours, 35 minutes ago

SAN FRANCISCO - Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia
that allows anyone to contribute articles, is
tightening its rules for submitting entries following
the disclosure that it ran a piece falsely implicating
a man in the Kennedy assassinations.

Wikipedia will now require users to register before
they can create articles, Jimmy Wales, founder of the
St. Petersburg, Fla.-based Web site, said Monday.

The change comes less than a week after John
Seigenthaler Sr., who was Robert Kennedy's
administrative assistant in the early 1960s, wrote an
op-ed article revealing that Wikipedia had run a
biography claiming Seigenthaler had been suspected in
the assassinations of the former Attorney General and
his brother, President John F. Kennedy.

Wikipedia, which on Monday offered more than 850,000
articles in English, has grown into a storehouse of
pieces on topics ranging from medieval art to nano
technology. The volume of content is possible because
the site relies on volunteers, including many experts
in their fields, to submit entries and edit previously
submitted articles.

The Web site hopes that the registration requirement
will limit the number of stories being created, Wales
said.

"What we're hopeful to see is that by slowing that
down to 1,500 a day from several thousand, the people
who are monitoring this will have more ability to
improve the quality," Wales said Monday. "In many
cases the types of things we see going on are impulse
vandalism."

Wikipedia visitors will still be able to edit content
already posted without registering. It takes 15 to 20
seconds to create an account on the Web site, and an
e-mail address is not required.

Seigenthaler, a former newspaper editor at the
Tennessean in Nashville, Tenn., and founder of the
Freedom Forum First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt
University, said that following his op-ed piece in USA
Today the biography of him was changed to remove the
false accusations.

But Seigenthaler said the current entry on Monday
still got some facts wrong, apparently because
volunteers are confusing him with his son, John
Seigenthaler Jr., a journalist with NBC News.

Also disturbing is a section of his biography that
tracks changes made to the article, Seigenthaler, Sr.
said. Entries in that history section label him a
"Nazi" and say other "really vicious, venomous,
salacious homophobic things about me," he said.

Wales said those comments would be removed.

For 132 days, Seigenthaler said the biography of him
falsely claimed that "for a brief time, he was thought
to have been directly involved in the Kennedy
assassinations of both John, and his brother, Bobby."

The biography also falsely stated that he had lived in
the Soviet Union from 1971 to 1984.

Seigenthaler said he wasn't convinced the new
registration requirement would stop the practice of
vandals posting content that is slanderous or
knowingly incorrect. Wikipedia will either have to fix
the problem or will lose whatever credibility it still
has, he said.

"The marketplace of ideas ultimately will take care of
the problem," Seigenthaler said. "In the meantime,
what happens to people like me?"

1) Aren't there copywright issues with copying and pasting whole articles from the AP? (or AP writers) I don't know anything about it, but if there are, someone should delete this thread.

2) I've always found the mathematics section of Wikipedia to be very reliable - I don't know if anyone has had a different experience.

I'm not really sure about the copyright issues... likely not. But removing the offending text rather than removing the whole thread might be more beneficial.

To respond to the article: I too have found the mathematics section of Wikipedia to be very reliable. It is my opinion that the article is blowing the whole issue way out of proportion. The fact that anyone can edit articles makes the entire system prone to vandalism, and it is inevitable with that design. It doesn't help that Wikipedia is the largest wiki in the world. Volunteers help revert that, but some of it can still fall through the cracks. Planetmath is unique in several ways I think: it is not as popular as Wikipedia, and would not attract as many vandals. Planetmath pages use a more intricate permissions scheme making it difficult for vandalism to occur randomly. Finally, not many people know LaTeX, making it hard for would-be vandals to well... deface math formulas (if such a thing can even be done). It also seems that the culture of physics and math pages to have developed differently from the rest: it seems many experts have devoted their time an effort to creating and protecting math and science pages, whereas the general pages have a more varied set of contributors. As a final point: math and science related articles are easily proved or disproved based on our body of knowledge. Topics such as politics and current events deal more with social issues that are not as "black and white" and so are more prone to bias.

P.S. I really wished the MediaWiki software provided a spell checker.

Also, this post really does not belong in the injective function article but rather as a general post.

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