Fork me on GitHub
Math for the people, by the people.

User login

taking square root algebraically

Synonym: 
square root of complex number
Type of Math Object: 
Derivation
Major Section: 
Reference

Mathematics Subject Classification

30-00 no label found12D99 no label found

Comments

taking the square root of any rational number follows an older inverse proportion documented by Archimedes, Fibonacci and Galileo.

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Would be glad if some member would volunteer to make the following entry in maths encyclopedia: Mangammal primes: These are the impossible prime factors of (3^n - 2). see A 123239 in OEIS. This is a corollary of Ëuler’s generalisation of Fermat’s theore- a further generalisation (ISSN 1550-3747 ).

Supposing we wish to find the base for which 77 is a pseudoprime we can use pari. The programme: p(n) =(n^76-1)/77 for(n=1, 60,print (p(n))). Thus I found that 34 is a valid base for pseudoprimality of 77.

Perhaps bc1 can help administration to restore the search facility.

Perhaps bc1 can help administration to restore the search facility.

Perhaps bc1 can help administration to restore the search facility.

Not only 29, but also 41, 43, 62, 64, 71, 76, 83, 92, 97 and 104 are valid bases for pseudoprimality of 105.

In Z(i) (20 + 21*i) and (21 + 20*i) are valid bases for pseudoprimality of 105. Needless to say their conjugates are also valid bases.

I was looking for something predictable in finding valid bases for pseudoprimality of 105. Happy to say that I succeeded: starting from 41, 41 + 21*k, where k belongs to N are valid bases; exceptions - integers ending with 0 or 5. Needless to say there are bases other than these.

We can use pari. There is another way: Take a known base for pseudoprimality of a composite number. Split it into two parts such that one part is exactly divisible by one or more prime factors of the given composite number and the other is exactly divisible by the remaining prime factor/s. Let any one of the two parts be the real and the other be the coefficient of i in the complex base. Example: 29 is a base for pseudo -primality of 105 in Z. 29 can be split into two parts 14 and 15. 14 is divisible by 7 and 15 is divisible by 3 and 5. Hence 14 + 15i and 15 + 14i are valid bases in Z(i). Needless to say conjugates of these two are also valid bases.

Subscribe to Comments for "taking square root algebraically"